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Author Topic: New Website, Kilimanjaro and sponsorship thoughts  (Read 44458 times)

trunl

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hey guys, i just spent the last couple days at the computer making my own website. if you want to check it out you can at www.geocities.com/jeffwittliff

i appreciate any feedback positive or negative


bye the way, does anyone else have that database error on the home page?


trunl
« Last Edit: Oct 31 2004, 14:53 by 7summits »
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Ron

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Re: New Website
« Reply #1 on: Jul 16 2004, 12:44 »

txs Trunl ill take a look at it.

look oke m8..big plans ;D....follow your dream

Yeah I also have that DB error....cant do anything about it though and garry is in Pakistan climbing :?)
« Last Edit: Jul 16 2004, 12:47 by Ron »
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trunl

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Re: New Website
« Reply #2 on: Jul 17 2004, 21:35 »

as you can see on my website, the first climb i want to do is kili. i have a few questions:
is this itinerary going to give me a good chance for success?
Day 1: Fly London to Kilimanjaro International Airport
On arrival at the airport, we are met by our representative and driven to our hotel in Moshi. This is a long day's travelling but we are settled into the hotel before midnight.
Day 2: Enter Arusha National Park and begin ascent of Mt Meru
Today, we drive to the foot of Mt Meru, a collapsed volcanic crater. The climb up it is said to rival that of Kilimanjaro. Leaving the hotel at about 10:00 a.m., a drive of 2 hours leads to the National Park entrance and from there we trek to the Miriakamba Hut. It can be extremely hot for those not used to the high temperatures of Africa, so plenty of water should be taken on the trek along with sunscreen, sun hat and, ideally, a large umbrella. The walk takes about three hours, leaving the rest of the day to explore the Meru crater. At its highest point, it forms a sheer cliff face more than 1,500m/5,000ft high and is one of the largest of its type in the world. The crater itself is well vegetated and full of wildlife. There is a good chance that we will see some big game.
Day 3: Climb to the Saddle Hut on Mt Meru
This is another short day to assist acclimatisation. However, you will be working hard and not yet fully accustomed to the climate of Africa, so regular water stops are taken. A 4-hour walk up the crater rim leads to Saddle Hut where we stop for the night. The Saddle lies between Mt Meru and Little Meru (3,820m/12,530ft) just to the north. In the afternoon, we can make the short climb to Little Meru, which is an excellent viewpoint.
Day 4: Summit day on Mt Meru (4,556m/14,947ft)
After an early start, we walk around the rim of the crater to the summit of Mt Meru. If it is clear, we have stunning views of the African plain and, of course, of Kilimanjaro which is only about 30 miles away to the east. Then we descend back to the Saddle Hut for a late breakfast. We then descend to the Miriakamba hut for the remainder of the day in order to rest after the exertions of the climb. This option also avoids the long walk down in the heat of the day.
Day 5: Descend Meru and head back to Moshi for rest
We make a very early start for the descent back to the National Park Gates. Following the drive back to Moshi and the hotel, we have the afternoon to rest and recover, ready for the climb of our main objective - Kilimanjaro.
Day 6: Begin ascent of Kilimanjaro
After a good night's sleep, we travel by jeep to the start of the Umbwe Route, at the foot of our main objective, Kilimanjaro. Being a more arduous trek than most routes on Kilimanjaro, the Umbwe has few visitors and is much more interesting than more popular trails. From the gate at 1,400m/4,590ft and with porters carrying our equipment, we set off up a good track. Eventually it narrows to become barely discernible, as we wind up through dense jungle. The rain forest is magnificent and the track a steady climb, finishing at the campsite at Forest Caves, at an altitude of 3,000m/9,840ft (approx 5 hours).
Day 7: Climb to Baranco Hut
The route continues through forest with a good chance of seeing Colobus monkeys before rearing up on to a steep, narrow ridge with deep valleys on either side. This gives a distinct high mountain feel. The flora is unusual, including African walnut trees draped in 'goats beard' moss. The huge ravine of the great Baranco drops away on one side and directly ahead is the awesome Breach Wall of Kilimanjaro. At 3,000m, we emerge on to high moorland and the entire character of the trek changes. The Baranco Hut, little more than a tin shack, is reached in mid-afternoon and we set up camp (3,900m/12,790ft, 5 hours).
Day 8: Acclimatisation and exploration
This is an acclimatisation day involving a short climb up the Baranco Wall to view the southern glaciers of Kilimanjaro. The hike provides good views of this side of the mountain and of Mt Meru. We then descend back to Baranco camp in time for lunch and a restful afternoon.
Day 9: Climb to Arrow Hut beneath the Breach Wall
We continue up the ridge until it joins the final slopes of the volcano. We have tremendous views of the Breach Wall to the right and of our route to the summit, up the Western Breach directly above. We camp near the ruins of the Arrow Hut which is a good, level campsite (4,800m/15,740ft, 5 hours).
Day 10: Summit day
We awake very early and are well underway by 3 a.m., climbing by head-torch until the pre-dawn light begins to illuminate the upper slopes of the volcano. We climb the steep scree and then rock that leads up past the Arrow Glacier to the crater rim. There a several sections of scrambling over the top of incredible frozen lava formations. As the sun rises on the horizon, we witness the remarkable shadow of Kilimanjaro stretching across the plains behind us, towards Mt Meru. Following the crater rim, we cross the foot of the tiny Furtwangler Glacier and then make a final steep climb up to Uhuru Summit (5,895m/19,340ft). The ascent from the camp to the summit takes between 6 and 8 hours.
The views from the summit are breathtaking; to the north stands Mt. Kenya, the second highest peak on the continent and to the west Mt. Meru. We spend about an hour on the summit, taking in the exposure and watching the clouds as they begin to form around the tips of the volcanoes. From the exhilaration of reaching the summit we continue eastwards along the crater rim, following the top of the tourist track, to Stella Point. Here, we leave the tourist track and turn down steep scree to the little-frequented Barafu Hut (4,600m/15,088ft) and on to the Mweka Hut (3,100m/10,170ft) at the start of the forest. This is a long but very rewarding day.
 
Day 11: Descent via the Mweka Hut
Leaving Mweka Hut, the path descends steeply through lush green forest. The route follows the crest of a broad ridge separating two river valleys, before the path widens and leads us to Mweka Village. From the village of Mweka, we are taken by jeep to our hotel in Moshi. We have a good meal and a few drinks to celebrate in the evening.
Day 12: At Leisure in Moshi, evening flight to London
We have the day to explore Moshi and to wind down, after the relatively fast pace of the expedition. A visit to the market place at Moshi's centre perhaps, might give us the only real experience of Tanzanian life as it is lived daily by the locals. We will also have the opportunity to buy local handicrafts as souvenirs of our African adventures. We depart in the evening to catch our homebound flight. 


also another question: does anyone use jagged globe? are they trustworthy?

trunl
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Corsair

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Re: New Website
« Reply #3 on: Aug 5 2004, 06:04 »

looks like a good plan to me. when are you off?

jagged globe has as far as i know a good reputation.

i'm off soon as well, may see you in africa  ;)
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trunl

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Re: New Website
« Reply #4 on: Aug 5 2004, 07:59 »

late december to early january...


trunl
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Funl

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Re: New Website
« Reply #5 on: Aug 8 2004, 17:55 »

Hi Trunl,

I'm a big fan of yours. Great that you are trying to realize your dreams (although I don't think you'll make it with limited climbing experience and limited $).

How did climbing in US go? Summit? Good time? With or without oxygen?

How is prep for kili going... did you get all funds?

Thanks,

Funl
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trunl

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Re: New Website
« Reply #6 on: Aug 8 2004, 21:55 »

still on my way to getting funds for kili... thanks for the fan base...


trunl
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7summits

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Re: New Website
« Reply #7 on: Aug 22 2004, 17:58 »

txs Trunl ill take a look at it.

look oke m8..big plans ;D....follow your dream

Yeah I also have that DB error....cant do anything about it though and garry is in Pakistan climbing :?)

who's garry ???

 O0

db fixed, thanks, off to Tibet now!
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Ron

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Re: New Website
« Reply #8 on: Aug 23 2004, 03:04 »

Garry??

hmmm a weird bloke from amsterdam
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trunl

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Re: New Website
« Reply #9 on: Aug 24 2004, 04:03 »

listen, i am 15 years old. i do not have the luxery (not spelled correct) to just climb what i want when i want. the only other way that my parents would let me go would be if i went to africa with them, and they are not rich (they would not be able to afford it) or in the correct physical condition.

and about the oxygen, i dont know if you are just being sarcastic, so i will answer it anyway. i will not be using oxygen at all.


trunl
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Buddha

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Re: New Website
« Reply #10 on: Sep 6 2004, 21:27 »

Hi trunl,

This is my first post to these forums but most likely not the last. I've been around here for a long time as a guest just reading.

Now to your website.. If you are serious about your attempts to climb the seven summits, which I don't doubt that you are you might wanna start considering how you look in the eyes of other people. Having a website hosted by Geocities wouldn't really turn me on if I were a big company that you came looking for cash from. Invest some of your weekly allowance into your own domain name, cost is roughly $20-25.
As a sponsor your application would hit the trash can as soon as I came to the website URL, if not earlier.

When I've started talking about sponsorship I will continue by saying the following, it's a lot easier to get equipment then hard cash. Again, as a corporation I would never finance an unexperienced mountaineer's dreams but maybe, just maybe I would give him or her some  free equipment. My advice to you though, finance the first 3 or 4 summits yourself, before looking for sponsors who are supposed to give you cash. After 1 summit you can try and get some equipment sponsors.

I also have a hard time seeing how the trip and summit attempt to Kilimanjaro can cost $7500???  :o
I live in Sweden and most travel agencies here have charter trips going to Tanzania and Mt. Kilimanjaro. You go down there and travel with local guides which are extremely good. The cost for one of those trips is about $800-1000 but then the airfare to Tanzania isn't included which is an extra $1000.
All in all roughly $2000.

When you write that the cost is $7,500 I think that you should also specify what kind of cash is required for the different things.

I'm not trying to come down on you or your dreams, just trying to put a different angle on your quest at hand.
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trunl

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Re: New Website
« Reply #11 on: Sep 7 2004, 01:45 »

buddha,
i thank you for your post. first of all, i am 15 years old and cannot finance some serious expeditions by myself. i cannot climb by myself, so i must climb with a company, therefore the cost is higher. and as for the airfare, i live in america, so the airfare is higher. and about only a fraction of the money is used for equipment.


trunl
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Buddha

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Re: New Website
« Reply #12 on: Sep 7 2004, 02:56 »

I can appreciate the fact that you are 15 years old and wanting to climb but perhaps you should also be a bit more realistic then and hold off the BIG mountains and climb some smaller ones in the US. You'll gain a lot of experience and meanwhile maybe you can get some kind of job outside your schoolhours and get some cash to finance your trips.

I've lived in the US myself and I know that it isn't that expensive to go to Europe. Take the airfare I was talking about to Kilimanjaro. That cost was from Sweden but I would go then with KLM which is Dutch, so I would touch down and change plane in Amsterdam. In fact for me a trip to the US with KLM is only about $500, so... Airfare for you wouldn't be that expensive anyhow. Say $1500 all in all.

Most expeditions to Kilimanjaro goes through agencies, in fact, if I'm not mistaken you cannot climb the mountain without a guide.
There is no need to go with an expensive tour operator unless you want to pay a lot more then necessary..
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tanner

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Re: New Website
« Reply #13 on: Sep 7 2004, 10:52 »

Just adding to what Buddha was saying....
you can go to these places guided (to appease your parents), but for way cheaper. For Aconcagua, I would guess no more than $4,000 including airfare. You just have to find local companies as opposed to expensive American based companies. The quality of the expeditions are usually very similar (especially on the seven summits) if you go with popular local companies as their economy depends on your dollars. The difference might be slight, but the price is great. After all, it is the same mountain, the same journey, and the same accomplishment.
If you dont have a job already, I would get one. A lot of my customers are sponsors (and I have raised about $3,000 from a dog wash of all places). At work, you can show how dedicated you are (great points for a teenager) to something very simple. And even with my pay checks working on the weekends (Junior year of high school didn't allow any more work time than that with all the homework), I was able to finance an Aconcagua and Denali expedition this year (so it is possible!) as well as my website (Homestead offers a great website program).
   I hope I am not annoying you. It would be great to see you succeed, but after trying your approach to sponsorship for five years (with only gear sponsorships), I would reccomend changing your sponsorship strategy. Buddha's advice is excellent, and I would definately follow his plan (its exactly what I've been doing to get sponsorship this last year except it only took me six years of trial and error to get to that point). It seems like you are driven enough, that regardless of when and how far you get, you will eventually be on all the seven.....until then have fun getting the funds,
Tanner
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Andreas

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Re: New Website
« Reply #14 on: Sep 7 2004, 22:34 »

buddha,
i thank you for your post. first of all, i am 15 years old and cannot finance some serious expeditions by myself. i cannot climb by myself, so i must climb with a company, therefore the cost is higher. and as for the airfare, i live in america, so the airfare is higher. and about only a fraction of the money is used for equipment.
trunl

Have you investigated how the present recordholder or Dan Lochoner or Britoon K financed they first climb? My guess is that they probarbly did not get sponsored.

About your website I have some questions. Would it not be a good idea to write your name ??? You can only guess from the web adress that your name is Jeff Wittliff.  Sorry to say but I have to agree with Buddah that your website seems a little bit amateur.

Why do you plan to climb Cho Oyo a year before Everest ??? Would it not be cheaper if you climbed just before your first atempt on Everest, like Harry ??? When you write that you want to visit the poles I hope that doesnt mean to fly into the poles and be there for half an our and then fly back home. O0
You should do it the hard way, unsuported by ski! >:D

I wish you all the best and hope you acheive your goals!
« Last Edit: Sep 8 2004, 00:26 by Andreas »
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trunl

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Re: New Website
« Reply #15 on: Sep 8 2004, 04:04 »

i plan to do everything handicapped. i will climb the mountains without oxygen, and go to the poles unsupported. but probably not solo. but im not gonna make that definite....for now......


trunl
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Ron

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Re: New Website
« Reply #16 on: Sep 8 2004, 04:28 »

young and ambitious  :)...very good.
You will see in the future whats can be done or not, realistic or not, and how you will hold under an expedition when the going gets difficult, hard, and inconvenient .
Maybe in 5 years you say naaahhh, not for me.....or you will go for it!
Its not all that romantic as in the books or movies ya know
But you'll learn m8..follow your as long as you can.
« Last Edit: Sep 8 2004, 04:29 by Ron »
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Buddha

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Re: New Website
« Reply #17 on: Sep 8 2004, 09:14 »

i plan to do everything handicapped. i will climb the mountains without oxygen, and go to the poles unsupported. but probably not solo. but im not gonna make that definite....for now......

Handicapped? Isn't that the only way to go, without oxygen that is...?

Anyway, I hope that you will broaden your mind and let some of the information and advice given to you in this thread actually stick to your brain.  ::)

It's great to be young and ambitious, we've all been young at one time or another. Just remember that it's better to be young and insightful than young and ignorant. Remove the blindfold from your eyes and behold....  :P  *wishes for a Buddha icon to appear*
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MikeW

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Re: New Website
« Reply #18 on: Sep 8 2004, 21:32 »

Hi Trunl!

We all have dreams. Continue and follow your dreams as far as you can go. As for myself, with Kili and Elbrus done, there is only 5 more to go with Aconcagua next. I did use 7Summits for Elbrus, nice chaps in Russia and well organized for a fraction of the cost of Alpine Ascents or Mountain Madness.

Between your expedition, go and climb smaller mountains. I live in Quebec, Canada and I go to Mt Washington NH, Mt Katadhin ME, Mt Marcy NY and others mountains to practice my climbing.

Have fun and good luck on Kili.

MikeW
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ablakov

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Re: New Website
« Reply #19 on: Sep 9 2004, 00:40 »

still on my way to getting funds for kili... thanks for the fan base...


trunl

What other mountains have you climbed (7summits or non-7)?

Was it as you expected?
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