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Author Topic: NZ Documentary Dying For Everest about David Sharp & Mark Inglis  (Read 17003 times)

7summits

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I just found out about this documentary and found it online (not sure how long it will stay there):

It is in two parts
http://www.sealion.co.nz/view/1124/dying-for-everest-part-1-of-2
http://www.sealion.co.nz/view/1125/dying-for-everest-part-2-of-2

It is a 45 minute documentary discussing the death of David Sharp, the decisions made by Mark Inglis' teams, Russel Brice, the media and Sir Edmund Hillary.

Some authentic footage is used, combined with new interviews of the main characters, also including Jamie McGuiness.
Much has been re-enacted (why always on Mt Cook!!!!), so do not think you are seeing the real Everest. The best real parts are shown when the death of a climber 10 years ago is discussed, where Mark Whetu was filming, excellent shots of the summitridge, 2nd Step and summit area.

Take a look and tell me what you think...
« Last Edit: Aug 31 2007, 14:53 by 7summits »
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m.c. reinhardt

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Watched the video; interesting perspective. Every situation on a mountain is individual and should be looked at that way. It seemed that David was close enough to C-3 that a rescue might have been performed without serious danger to others. I am assuming that he did not have rescue insurance but it is sad that Asian Trekking did not step up to the plate. On the other hand, I donít feel it is right to judge when I was not there! I do feel that Mark Ingles became the target which must have been devastating for him. It had to take away from his great accomplishment of summiting Everest with prosthetic legs. Thatís my 2 cents.

MC
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7summits

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Problem is that cheap re-enactments on lower mountains give a wrong idea about the scale and terrain. It seemed that a rescue could be done in a few hours. That's probably also why Inglis was too defensive. I was not there at that time, but a week later. It is a tough place.

I would have welcomed some reactions from the 35+ other climbers that passed him. Doesn't anybody have some recollection about whether radio calls have been made, if David had shown any sign of life etc.? And what about David's teammates? Was there nobody that warned David not to go up in the afternoon and solo? Nobody was missing him? This would never have happened on a bigger team.

Asian trekking is just a supplier, whose services and responsibility stop at ABC. It is the choice of the climbers if they join an expedition that takes the services and responsibility to a higher level or if they want to take that responsibility themselves. It is incorrect to blame Asian Trekking for the choices a client makes and the reactions of others. It is like blaming the airlines the climbers use to fly to Lukla: "20%" of all climbers that died on the Nepal side were flown in by Yeti-air!!".
Note that this number is completely fictional, just to illustrate the point  8)
« Last Edit: Aug 31 2007, 13:54 by 7summits »
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m.c. reinhardt

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Asian trekking is just a supplier, whose services and responsibility stop at ABC. It is the choice of the climbers if they join an expedition that takes the services and responsibility to a higher level or if they want to take that responsibility themselves. It is incorrect to blame Asian Trekking for the choices a client makes and the reactions of others. It is like blaming the airlines the climbers use to fly to Lukla: "20%" of all climbers that died on the Nepal side were flown in by Yeti-air!!".
Note that this number is completely fictional, just to illustrate the point  8)
If it came off that I was blaming Asian Trekking, I apologize. I know that they are not responsible. David made his own choices and I firmly believe that there are no guarantees in the ďdeath zoneĒ. Itís just that David died in a place where a rescue might have been made without risking the lives of others if AT would have gone beyond what was legally required. Yes, it would have cost them quite a bit of money but they might have been reimbursed if David had lived. This really is a controversial topic that is not by any means black or white.
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7summits

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Hi MC, no I was making a general remark as in the docu Asian Trekking was 'mentioned', as has been done before by some dubious websites reporting from their desks, implying that they are unsafe.

What many people fail to see that AT is not much different than Toyota or Poisk. Evereybody uses Toyota landcruisers to get to BC, but they have no responsibility for what you do there or higher, and you are responsible for bringing the right gear, which tey will transport. Poisk will get you good oxygen, but does not tell you how much, neither do they have to bring it up the mountain for you.

Asian Trekking asks what you want and delivers it: basic services (meaning a cook and some food and a permit and transport) as David Sharp wanted, or a private guide/Sherpa, radios, doctor etc. They can supply more, but if people choose to take the minimum, they cannot be blamed, nor do they have the power to go up and help. Especially when the climber chooses to go so budget that he does not even take a radio.

It is the climbers responsibility to come prepared, but most find out only too late how serious Everest is, after all, everybody (who's never been there) says it is too easy! Then suddenly they need our doctors, our oxygen, our tents and much more. Which we have always given/borrowed when requested by the way...

The Discovery producer who was in Camp3 all the time has just confirmed to me that no radio calls were made in the night, she would have heard them, even if they would not have reached NC or ABC. In ABC Discovery filmed all conversations non-stop, and they have also no recollection.

Anyway, I do think the emotions of some of the climbers in the docu are genuine as well as the observation that the world in general is getting more impersonal and distant.
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Roger

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If I was up that high, I would have no idea of how to manage the situation. If I was asked to assist a person who was injured while on my way up, I would certainly do so to the best of my ability and forego any summit attempt. Summiting would not be a priority for me, assisting another human being takes much higher precedence.

If it was a case of no chance of a rescue, I feel that I would at least sit with a dying person and at least talk to him/her and stay with them for as long as is safe for me to do so. I would certainly agree the world is becoming a more desensitised place.

I can make no comment on people who may have passed by as each person in any given situation makes judgement calls and sets their own standards and ethics. As Harry has testified with his own experiences, extreme altitude is a dangerous place at times and sadly people die.

Cheers

Roger
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jedi-knight

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Watched the video....both parts. I wasnt there when it happen so I shouldnt judge.

From a neutral party's perspective, how come only Russell Brice's team was singled out, and in particular, Mark Inglis?

I am also wondering, why is it no others who passed David Sharp come forward with their side of the story?

It may seem easy to sit here and say what should or should not have been done. But I am quite sure high up on the mountain, things are very, very different. You may want to help, but to what extend can you help? You may be struggling yourself.

Personal responsibility is important in my opinion. Mountaineers have to manage the risks they are facing, and if you go up with the bare minimum, you should know the dangers ahead. You may be lucky to get through with the bare minimum, but you may also die. However, this is not to say that if you go with a fully prepared expedition team, you will not face death. But, at least, you die knowing that you have done all you could to prepare yourself. It is just that your time on earth is up. Such is life............

Just my 2 cents worth....
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MoT

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Watched the video....both parts. I wasnt there when it happen so I shouldnt judge.

From a neutral party's perspective, how come only Russell Brice's team was singled out, and in particular, Mark Inglis?

Just my 2 cents worth....

Mark Inglis and co were singled out because the press goes for the tabloid story. "A guy who nearly died on a mountain who 'left' a climber to die on a mountain." It would've sold more stories than any other. And then for a guide to order his clients to leave a climber from the safety of a lower camp again would sell more papers to armchair mountaineers...

Quote
I am also wondering, why is it no others who passed David Sharp come forward with their side of the story?

Why would they come forward and get the same flak that Inglis was getting? Easier for him to be the fall guy I guess.

Just my 2 cent.

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Mountain John

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Hey Harry,

Maybe I'll watch video later.  It was on dateline here the other week, but I was on a 5 day backpacking trip, so i missed.  But I followed closely when it happened.  I don't fault anyone and I repeat this to people that ask about it.

When i was in the death zone for the first time, i don't think i would have realized someone needed help or if i could even help them.  It is SO different than sea level where most humans, including me, would risk their lives to save someone.  SO different.  Now, if I go back for a second time, that might be different cause I have experience and am not so intimitated.

If I passed him, I might have not seen him or if I did, I might have nodded my head hello ("how ya doing?") not realizing he needed help.

Harry, i visited our friend Karo in L.A. for a couple days (he is the best host).  We hung out with his friends and one guy made me realize something.  If you go into a fire to rescue your loved one, you are in the "zone" for 2 glorious minutes.  that is, focus on one thing.  Well, on Everest, I was in the "zone" for 10 glorious hours going up.  that is, my focus was on NOTHING else except my next step, for survival.

My understanding is that Asian Trekking is that way....solo people unless you team up.  They know this when they start and know the risks.

Harry, you might recall...I bought rescue insurance (Alex told me to) and you and others (especially Jamie) (not McGuiness) "laughed" at me for even considering a possibility of a rescue in the death zone.  I wasn't too happy for wasting that money but understood and accepted the reality, and went anyway.

Same for Marko, I don't blame Alex, AT ALL, as Marko (God bless his soul) made his own decisions at a lower elevation.

Maybe (some) people think this is Disneyland, but it is not.  This is Everest.

John
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7summits

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thanks John, you know I agree with you. Most people that criticise in any way have never been there.

Or they were the first, when it was by definition impossible to find another climber up there  ;)

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